Skip to main content
Blog
Wednesday, January 27 2021

Loss of Taste and Smell w COVID-19

 

Why Many People Lose Taste and Smell with COVID-19

From the earliest onset of the coronavirus pandemic, one of the biggest mysteries has been why so many people who get COVID-19 lose their sense of taste and smell. Studies have shown that up to 80% of all people experienced this symptom. In many cases, it's the first indication of infection and, in fact, is frequently the only symptom they experience. For most patients, this is a temporary symptom and the ability to taste and smell returns within a couple of weeks.

 

At first, it was assumed that, because COVID-19 is an upper respiratory illness, that people lost their smell and taste because swelling in the sinus is and a buildup of mucus was blocking the olfactory neurons, which happens with many upper respiratory illnesses, including cold and flu.

As researchers continued to study this phenomenon, evidence started to pile up that it was more of a neurological issue than a physical blockage in the sinuses. In other words, it was thought that the neurons that sense smell were being damaged by the coronavirus. Fortunately, continued research suggests that the damage is being done to cells that support those neurons, which more easily regenerate, than the neurons themselves.

 

Oddly, research has also showing that in some patients, this results in the connections being temporarily damaged. That has led to reports that some patients are getting unpleasant phantom smells, such as smoke, rubber burning, or garbage, when no known source of that smell is nearby. Or patients have reported that certain familiar smells are perceived is something different, like taking a whiff of your morning coffee and thinking it smells like fish.

Fortunately, for most patients, these symptoms fade away within a few weeks and the sense of taste and smell returns to normal.

 

At Workplace Screening Intelligence, we provide a wide range of services that include clinical laboratory testing, employment drug testing, parental drug testing, and DNA paternity testing, as well as COVID-19 screening. For more information or to make an appointment, please call 800-338-5515 or visit our website at www.workplacescreening.com.

Posted by: Phil Dubois AT 04:40 am   |  Permalink   |  Email
Saturday, January 16 2021

Can Vitamin D Supplements Really Protect You From COVID-19?

 

Lately, there has been a lot of talk in the media, and especially on social media, about the benefits of taking Vitamin D supplements as protection against coronavirus. And while there are signs that Vitamin D supplements might offer some protection, there is not enough evidence to show definitively that it does, according to the National Institutes of Health.

 

The reason Vitamin D is thought to protect against COVID-19 is that it is generally known to be beneficial to your immune system. Additionally, there is research that shows that people who have lower Vitamin D levels are more likely to test positive for COVID-19. Some studies have even found that mortality rates from COVID-19 tend to be higher in countries that are farther from the equator where people are exposed to less sunlight, which is necessary for the body to produce its own natural Vitamin D. Although other factors, such as spending more time indoors due to colder weather, could also contribute to these high mortality rates.

 

Still, while these observations are prompting more studies, none of it proves that Vitamin D either prevents you from getting COVID-19 or reduces the severity of symptoms for people who are infected. That said, many physicians are advising patients to take a Vitamin D supplement because research has shown that 41% of adults in the U.S. have a Vitamin D deficiency and the overall health benefits are well established.

If you are considering taking a Vitamin D supplement, it's a good idea to discuss it with your physician first. A good rule of thumb is to not exceed 4,000 IU per day without your doctor’s permission. Taking too much Vitamin D can cause a condition known as Vitamin D toxicity. This can result in a buildup of excess calcium in the blood and cause symptoms like nausea and vomiting, along with other more severe symptoms.

 

At Workplace Screening Intelligence, we provide a wide range of services that include clinical laboratory testing, employment drug testing, parental drug testing, and DNA paternity testing, as well as COVID-19 screening. For more information or to make an appointment, please call 800-338-5515 or visit our website at www.workplacescreening.com.

Posted by: AT 07:22 am   |  Permalink   |  Email
Tuesday, January 12 2021

4 Common Myths About COVID-19

Since the global coronavirus pandemic started over a year ago, the topic has dominated the headlines every day and taken over on social media. As researchers have learned more and more about the virus and COVID-19, new information has been continuously fed to the public, practically in real time.

The result has been an environment where it's difficult two separate myth from reality, or know the difference between facts and rumors. That said, there are several misunderstandings that the many people may have and should be cleared up.

 

COVID-19 is not like getting a cold.

Approximately 80% of all COVID-19 cases result in fever and body aches, as well as upper respiratory symptoms. These are symptoms not typically associated with the common cold. Additionally, about 14% of all cases result in severe illness and require hospitalization, while 6% of patients become critically ill, even requiring a mechanical respirator.

 

COVID-19 does not only affect older people.

While younger adults tend to have stronger immune systems and are less likely to get sick, they can still get COVID-19. That includes cases that are considered severe and can even cause death. Younger people are, however, more likely to not show symptoms when infected by coronavirus, but that makes them more contagious and increasingly likely to transmit the virus to other people.

 

Holding your breath for 10 seconds doesn't mean you don't have coronavirus.

Yes, if you are experiencing COVID-19 with the severe respiratory issues it's known for, it may be difficult to hold your breath for 10 seconds without chest pain or tightness. That said, if you are infected with the virus but have no symptoms or only mild symptoms, you might be able to hold your breath for quite a while without any difficulty.

 

Taking Vitamin C supplements cannot prevent COVID-19.

Vitamin C is an essential nutrient for a healthy immune system, which means a deficiency in Vitamin C could make you more susceptible to being infected with coronavirus. However, in the U.S. and other developed countries, Vitamin C deficiency is extremely rare and there's no evidence to suggest that taking supplements has any effect on your risk for infection.

At Workplace Screening Intelligence, we provide a wide range of services that include clinical laboratory testing, employment drug testing, parental drug testing, and DNA paternity testing, as well as COVID-19 screening. For more information or to make an appointment, please call 800-338-5515 or visit our website at www.workplacescreening.com.

Posted by: AT 04:19 am   |  Permalink   |  Email
Sunday, January 10 2021

Three Types of COVID test

 

What You Need to Know About The 3 Types of COVID-19 Test

Even a full year into the global COVID-19 pandemic, and 10 months since it took hold in the United States, there are still a lot of questions about coronavirus. That includes which type of testing may be appropriate in a given situation. The answer depends on what your goal is and the purpose for seeking a test.

There are four scenarios possible for any individual when it comes to exposure to the coronavirus.

  1. You’ve never been exposed to the virus.
  2. You’ve been exposed but you don’t have an active infection.
  3. You've been exposed and are currently infected and showing symptoms, which means you’re contagious.
  4. You've been exposed and are currently infected with no symptoms, but still contagious.

It’s important to know whether you’re infected or not if, for example, your grandchildren are coming to visit you and you want to keep them safe. Or let’s say you’ve spent time recently with someone who later tested positive and you or someone you live with has a health condition that weakens their immune system.

Which test you choose will depend on your specific circumstances because there are differences to consider.

 

Antibody Testing

Exposure to any foreign body, including coronavirus, triggers your body’s immune system to produce antibodies against that virus. These are proteins that attach to the virus and prevent it from making you sick while also signaling to the immune system that the virus is a foreign body that needs to be eliminated. The test is based on a blood sample, so it must be done in a healthcare or testing environment like the one we provide at Workplace Screening. A positive test means that you have been exposed to the virus that causes COVID-19 at some point. It does not tell you if you have an active infection. Also, it’s important to remember that testing positive for these antibodies does not necessarily mean you are immune to COVID-19.

 

PCR Molecular Testing

Also known as RNA testing, PCR molecular testing is highly accurate. It works by testing the saliva or mucus for specific molecules in the RNA of the coronavirus. After the sample is taken, it is sent to a lab for analysis and results are returned in a couple of days. Because it’s so accurate, PCR testing is ideal for people who need to show that they are not infected so they can return to work or school. Some people also choose this type of test if they are planning to travel. Another advantage is that test kits are available that allow you to collect the required sample at home and ship it to the lab.

 

Antigen Testing

An antigen is defined as a molecular structure found on a pathogen that triggers an immune response. The biggest advantage of an antigen test is that the results are available in just a few minutes because the sample doesn’t need to be sent to a lab. The downside is that, while a positive test is highly accurate, the test is known to occasionally deliver false negatives. So, after a negative test, a doctor may order a more accurate molecular test to rule out an active infection.

 

At Workplace Screening Intelligence, we provide a wide range of services that include clinical laboratory testing, employment drug testing, parental drug testing, and DNA paternity testing, as well as COVID-19 screening. For more information or to make an appointment, please call 800-338-5515 or visit our website at www.workplacescreening.com.

Posted by: Phil Dubois AT 03:39 am   |  Permalink   |  Email